Love chocolate? I do. During my school years, I had the same chocolate bar every day: Neilson’s Treasures. Each bar had six milk chocolate squares, and each square was filed with something different. I can remember them all: nougat, strawberry, praline, caramel, Bordeaux and Turkish Delight. I still have no idea how they made them. To me (a food obsessed child), each square was a little treasure.

These days, chocolate bars aren’t in my diet too often. Instead I make my own little treasures: chocolate bark. It’s really easy, and you can add in whatever good things you like: almonds, pumpkin seeds, the grated rind of any fruit. Just don’t add sugary things like crushed candies, or the sugar stats will shoot up dramatically. Here’s some suggestions for keeping your chocolate cravings in check:

Make it dark: Dark chocolate sometimes has more fat and calories than milk chocolate, but it has fewer carbs and a healthier profile overall. Dark chocolate is full of healthy monounsaturated fatty acids, lots of iron, four times the fiber, and half the sugar of milk chocolate.

Make it small: A large portion of chocolate rakes in a lot of calories and carbs, so you have to make it small. The idea is to take some time to savor each small bite. Let it melt on your tongue; enjoy the richness; that is its own kind of satiety.

Learn how to eat chocolate: There are books on how to eat chocolate. Really. The point is not to just pop it in your mouth (so fleeting). For tips go to digitalnomad.nationalgeographic.com. It starts like this: “Begin by snapping the chocolate in half. Inhale and ponder the aromas you can sense”.

Recipe: Chocolate Bark with Orange and Cashews

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  • 300 gr dark chocolate (I used 70%)
  • 2/3 cup whole cashews
  • 1 small orange
  1. Remove the peel from the orange. Try to avoid the white part (the pith), because it can be bitter. Slice the peel into thin strips, then slice crosswise into small dice. Set aside.
  2. Set a small pot of water on the stove and bring to a simmer. Break chocolate into squares, and place in a heatproof bowl, then place the bowl over the simmering water. Do not let the bottom of the bowl touch the water (which could wind up burning the chocolate). Let the chocolate melt.
  3. Remove the bowl carefully (it will be hot), set on a counter, and add 1/3 cup of cashews.
  4. Take the prepared pan from the fridge and pour the chocolate mixture on top of the foil. Tip to make sure the chocolate is evenly spread.
  5. Place the rest of the cashews evenly on the surface of the chocolate. Sprinkle the orange peel over decoratively.
  6. Refrigerate until firm, about 40 minutes. The bark can be broken into pieces and stored in an airtight container in the fridge.
 

This recipe makes one servings.
Nutrition for one serving is as follows:

12
190

Calories

14

Fat

4

Protein

11

Carbs

4

Fibre

10

Sodium

Cholesterol

Saturated Fat

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This entry was posted in Dessert.